Brion Symposium 
4 - 5 June (Tue-Wed) 2002 - Vancouver - British Columbia
Last Updated @  2002-05-04 16:39:11 -0400


Measurements of Chemical Interest by Electron and VUV Photon Impact Methods


IMPORTANT DATES
30 April 2002 <Past> - Early registration date to minimize fees and book your accommodation early
15 May 2002 - Memorabilia stuff - Send to Adam!
3 June 2002 (Monday) - CIC Medal Lecture by Chris Brion - Chris Reception
4 June 2002 (Tuesday) - Brion Symposium Day 1 - Symposium Dinner
5 June 2002 (Wednesday) - Brion Symposium Day 2 - CSC Conference Dinner

For up-to-date registration and other info, please go to the CSC 2002 Site NOW!


Chris went fishing - 1962


Chris down under - 1988

   

Taking it easy already - 2001

Breaking News:  Professor Brion has just been awarded the 2002 CIC Medal, the highest honour given by the Chemical Insititute of Canada.  The CIC Medal Lecture is scheduled on 3 June (Monday). 

Congratulations, Chris!

Over the past 40 years, the contributions of Professor Brion to Chemistry have been both inspiring and extensive.  He has pioneered the development and application of several new types of Electron Impact Spectroscopy to problems in two important areas: (1) Quantitative radiation chemistry in the important UV to soft-X-ray region, and (2) Experimental momentum-space quantum chemistry and orbital imaging by Electron Momentum Spectroscopy.  Using instruments designed and built at UBC, Brion and his group have obtained new fundamental chemical information of interest not only to wide areas of modern chemistry but also to related interdisciplinary fields in the physical, biological, medical, pharmaceutical and material sciences, as well as to computer-aided molecular design.
In the early 1970’s and almost a decade before the availability of dedicated synchrotron light sources, Brion and his group reported some of the very first accurate measurements of absolute optical oscillator strengths (transition probabilities) for valence- and inner-shell photoabsorption and photoionization to highly excited and ionized electronic states in the UV, VUV and soft-X-ray regions, using the techniques known as Dipole (e,e), (e,2e) and (e,e+ion) Spectroscopies, which make use of the virtual photon field induced by a fast electron under forward-scattering conditions.  Despite the advent of synchrotron radiation experiments in the past 20 years, a large fraction of the known absolute quantitative data has come from Brion’s laboratory.  His compilations in 1984 [J. Electron Spectrosc. 33, 301-331], 1988 [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 17, 9-153] and 1997 [Chem. Phys. 223, 59-98], together with more recent publications, are the most accurate and most cited data available to date.  These benchmark data (available electronically at ftp.chem.ubc.ca/pub/cooper) are essential not only for testing quantum mechanical methods and providing insights into photoabsorption and photoionization phenomena, but also in areas such as radiation and space sciences, medicine, fusion, lasers, aeronomy and astrophysics.  Notable applications include his 1993 high-resolution measurements for CO and Kr in the UV region, which have been used to interpret interstellar spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope [Astrophys. J. 411, 750 (1993); 432, L139 (1994)].  His data for molecular oxygen are being used in the analysis of airglow measurements by the Canadian WINDII (Wind Imaging Interferometer) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite.
In the mid 1970’s, Brion was among the first to introduce a new double-electron coincidence technique (using the (e,2e) reaction under binary-encounter scattering conditions) to chemical problems, making possible orbital imaging and investigations of fundamental quantum chemical concepts from the momentum-space perspective for the first time.  Using increasingly sophisticated instruments developed at UBC, Brion and his group have creatively exploited the unique advantages of this new technique, known as Electron Momentum Spectroscopy (EMS), to image electron density in individual atomic and molecular orbitals in the low momentum part (corresponding to the chemically sensitive outer spatial region) of the wavefunction, and to provide new insights into fundamental concepts in quantum chemistry and bonding.  For example, his EMS data for many small molecules, most notably water, have led to the collaborative development and design of the most accurate Hartree-Fock and CI wavefunctions to date.  These results are now appearing in undergraduate texts [e.g., “Quantum Chemistry” by I. Levine (1991)] and changing the way we teach quantum chemical concepts.  Similarly, his EMS work on amines has corrected misconceptions about the relative electronegativity of the methyl group which had been based on intuitive arguments often used in textbooks.  In a spectacular demonstration of the technique, Brion has imaged valence orbital electron densities of biomolecules such as the amino acid glycine [Science 270, 786 (1995); JACS 118, 10533 (1996)] and pharmaceuticals such as an antibacterial agent urotropine [Chem. Phys. 263, 195 (2001)].  These studies on larger molecules are providing stringent tests for new quantum methods such as Density Functional Theory, particularly with respect to adequate basis sets and inclusion of correlation for meaningful modelling of the frontier orbital density.  The orbital density imaging capability of EMS [Chem. Phys. 270, 13 (2001)] has permitted the first direct experimental investigation of the different orbital models of chemistry, including Linus Pauling's localized valence bond theory of hybrid orbitals, Robert Mulliken's delocalized molecular orbitals theory and the Kohn-Sham orbitals of Density Functional Theory.  More than 120 invited lectures have been given at conferences, universities and research institutes worldwide, including the Opening Lecture at the 5th International Conference on Quantum Chemistry, the 62nd ACS Meeting in San Francisco in 1992, the CSC Congress at Halifax in 1993, the XVIII ICPEAC at Aarhus in 1993, the CAM’94 in Mexico, and at International Symposia in Beijing China in 1999 and Rolla, Missouri, USA in 2001. [
Chris' UBC website]

As we celebrate Chris Brion's four decades of scientific contribution to our fields and on the special occasion of his 65th birthday in 2002, we invite all of Chris' friends and colleagues to participate in this Special CSC Symposium to discuss science, to reminisce old-times and to generally have a good time.  We hope to see you in Vancouver in 2002.

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

The Symposium features a number of oral presentations of general interest to the study of electronic structure and processes using electron impact and VUV photon impact techniques.

CIC Medal Lecture - June 3 (Monday) 11:20 am – Hebb Theatre
Experimental Observation of Orbital-Like Behaviour of Valence Electrons - 
Which Orbital Models are Appropriate for Describing Electron Transfer? 
Brion C.E.

Brion Symposium - June 4 (Tuesday) – Buchanan B216

 

 

Chair: Tong Leung

 

9:00

9:05

Welcome

 

9:05

9:35

Development of Electron Momentum Spectroscopy for Molecules and Surfaces at The University of British Columbia
Zheng Y. -
Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

 

9:40

10:00

Coffee Break

 

10:00

10:30

A High-Resolution Electron Momentum Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Study into the Complete Valence Electronic Structure of Norbornene
Brunger M.J.
, Mackenzie-Ross H., Campbell L., Wang F., Appelbe B., Winkler D.A. -
Physics Department, Flinders University of South Australia, Australia

 

10:30

11:00

Investigation of  spectral momentum densities and the electronic structure of solids using  Electron Momentum Spectroscopy
Maarten Vos
, E. Weigold 
- Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratories, Australian National University, Canberra, Austratlia

 

11:00

11:30

Information Entropies, Particle Stopping, and Electron Momentum Spectroscopy
Smith Jr. V.H. -
Department of Chemistry, Queen's University, Ontario, Canada

 

11:30

12:00

Kohn-Sham Orbitals: Approximate? Yes, but What a Good Approximation!  
Hamel S., Casida M.E., Duffy P., Salahub D.R. -
LEDSS, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France

 

12:00

13:30

Lunch Break

 

 

 

Chair: John Neville

 

13:30

14:00

Dynamical theory of molecular photoionization
Langhoff P.W.
, Sheehy J.A., Arce J.A. -
San Diego Supercomputer Centre, University of California San Diego, CA, USA

 

14:00

14:30

Nondipole Angular-Distribution Effects in Photoemission from Atoms and Molecules
Hemmers O.
, Blackburn M., Goddard T., Glans P., Wang H., Whitfield S., Wehlitz R., Sellin I., Lindle D. -
Chemistry Department, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV USA

 

14:40

15:00

Coffee Break

 

15:00

15:30

The Role of Trimers in Electron Capture by HCl: An Ab Initio Study 
Armstrong D.A.
, Rauk A.

 

15:40

16:20

Break for Polanyi Lecture in Buchanan A 104

 

Brion Symposium - June 5 (Wednesday) – Buchanan B216

 

 

Chair: Adam Hitchcock

 

8:20

9:00

Break for Noranda Lecture in Buchanan A 104

 

9:05

9:35

An absolute wealth of data from the poor man's synchrotron
Cooper G. -
Chemistry Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada

 

9:40

10:00

Coffee Break

 

10:00

10:30

Oscillator Strengths for Electronic Transitions in Carbon Monoxide: an Astronomical Perspective
Federman S.R. -
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, OH 43606, USA

 

10:30

11:00

Generalized Oscillator Strengths of Resonance Transitions in Atoms and Molecules 
Fan X.W., Leung K.T. -
Chemistry Department & WATLabs, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

 

11:00

11:30

Interaction of VUV-Photons with Molecules: Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Molecular Superexcited States 
Hatano Y. -
Department of Molecular and Materials Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

 

11:30

12:00

Threshold photoionization processes in atoms and molecules 
King G.C. -
Department of Physics, University of Manchester, Manchester, U.K.

 

12:00

13:30

Lunch Break

 

 

 

Chair: Yenyou Zheng

 

13:30

14:00

Inner-shell excitation by electrons and photons: From molecules to biofilms
Hitchcock A.P. -
Chemistry Department, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada

 

14:00

14:30

Anionic Photofragmentation of Core-Excited Small Molecules 
Lindle D.W.
, Stolte W.C., Hemmers O., Ohrwall G., Hansen D.L., Dang L.T.N., Sant'Anna M.M., Schlachter A.S., Dominguez-Lopez I., Piancastelli M.N., Lubell M. - 
Chemistry Department, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV USA

 

14:40

15:00

Coffee Break

 

15:00

15:30

Inner-shell excitation and ionic fragmentation of aromatic molecules 
Neville J.J. -
Chemistry Department, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada

 

15:30

16:00

Materials Subjected to Intense Synchrotron Radiation: Some possible new experiments
Bawagan A.D.O. - Chemistry Department, Carleton University, Ontario, Canada

 

16:10

16:20

Closing Remarks: Chris Brion

 

 


These guys had hair - 1980

The "Brionites" at UBC - 1998


Pauline and Chris Brion - 2001

OTHER SYMPOSIUM MATTERS & SPONSORS

To contribute to the Memorabilia, please contact either Adam or Tong,  but please do so before May 15 to allow time for compilation.  For all other symposium details, including Brion reception, symposium dinner, and CSC conference dinner, please  email Tong here.

It is our pleasure to thank our sponsors for their financial contributions that make this symposium possible.  Please visit their websites: Johnsen Ultravac Inc., Systems for Research, Elseviser Science, Varian Canada

SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZERS

For more information about this special symposium, please contact:

Tong Leung
, Chemistry Department, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 Canada
http://leung.uwaterloo.ca | Voice 519-888-4567 x5826 | Fax 519-746-0435
Adam Hitchcock, Chemistry Department, McMaster University, Canada
Yenyou Zheng, Chemistry Department, UBC

Back to CSC 2002 Homepage | Program | HOME | WATLabs